Kevin Dye

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Kevin Dye
Kevin Dye
With FWC Since January 2008
Title Senior Research Scientist
Key Project(s) Civil Society Dialogue Project in Cyprus
Degree(s) BSc
Filed(s) of study Mechanical Engineering (major): Research Program Planning, Technology Strategy, Design Methodology, Requirements Engineering, Multi-Criteria Decision Support, Systems Analysis, Process Re-design, Knowledge Engineering
University(ies) Northeastern University, USA
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Specialization(s) Project Management
SDD Facilitation
Mediation
Notable Achievements Discovered the Erroneous Priority Effect



For a complete CV click Full CV of Kevin Dye.


Kevin Dye has joined the Cyprus Neuroscience and Technology Institute in January 2008 as Senior Research Scientist. Kevin is a long time collaborator of Aleco Christakis and Yiannis Laouris and founding member and staff of the Institute for 21st Century Agoras. He has supported and participated in several projects of Future Worlds Center starting with the Civil Society Dialogue Project in Cyprus in 2006.

Biography

Mr. Dye is the Director of Research for the Institute of 21st Century Agoras.

He previously served in research roles as:

  • Director of Research for the Massachusetts Office of Dispute Resolution,
  • Grant Writer, Researcher, & Assistant Director of Outreach at The Center for Green Chemistry of University of Massachusetts Boston & Lowell,
  • Chief Process Scientist for CWA Ltd. Interactive Management Consultants,
  • Director of Medical Diagnostic Decision Making at Diagnology Inc. during the Economic Development for Peace initiative in Northern Ireland.

After completing a degree in Mechanical Engineering with specialty in Thermodynamics from Northeastern University (1985) he joined United Technologies as Coordinator of Computer Aided Engineering for Otis Elevator. Transferring to United Technologies Research Center he led Integrated Product/Process Design in the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences Rapid Response Manufacturing Advanced Technology Program for the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He was sponsored as a Sloan Visiting Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1994-95.

His most recent work in the application of Structured Dialogic Design includes Evolution of the Technical Vision for Autonomous Systems and Future Synthesis of Electronic & Cyberwarfare in the Sensors Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratories. He has previously designed and conducted SDD workshops for the World Health Organization, the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, the U.S. Food& Drug Administration, the U.S. Forest Service, the National Mental Health Association, and the National Patient Safety Foundation.

Selected publications

  • Kevin Dye, Derya Beyatli, Yiannis Laouris, Alexander (Aleco) Christakis, Ilke Dagli, Tatjana Taraszow, “Examining Economic Integration and Free Trade within Cyprus using Structured Dialogic Design”, Systemic Practice and Action Research, 2013
  • Kevin Dye, Peter Jones, Tom Flanagan, Kirk Weigand “Collaborative foresight: A systemic approach to long-horizon strategic planning Running title: Collaborative Foresight in Strategic Planning”, The Journal of Technological Forecasting & Social Change, 2013
  • Kevin Dye, “A New Strategic Theory for Democratization Implies a New Communication Theory for Structured Dialogic Design”, Institute for 21st Century Agoras, 2013
  • Kevin Dye, Alexander (Aleco) Christakis, “The Cogniscope™ Lessons Learned in the Arena”, Springer, 2008
  • Kevin Dye, “Research-Informed Models for Communicating the Value of Court-Connected Alternative Dispute Resolution for Public Funding”, University of Massachusetts, 2006
  • Kevin Dye, Amy Cannon, John C. Warner, “Green Chemistry”, Journal of Environmental Impact Assessment, 2004
  • Kevin Dye, , Madhawa Palihapitiya, “Democracy in Practice: Lessons from New England”, Massachusetts Office of Public Collaboration Publications, 2008

Special Achievements

Kevin discovered the Erroneous Priority Effect.


External Links

Videos